SQL Injection Type 3 :- Finding the table name and Users

Finding the table name

The application’s built-in query already has the table name built into it, but we don’t know what that name is: there are several approaches for finding that (and other) table names. The one we took was to rely on a subselect.

A standalone query of


Returns the number of records in that table, and of course fails if the table name is unknown. We can build this into our string to probe for the table name:

SELECT email, passwd, login_id, full_name
  FROM table
 WHERE email = 'x' AND 1=(SELECT COUNT(*) FROM tabname); --';

We don’t care how many records are there, of course, only whether the table name is valid or not. By iterating over several guesses, we eventually determined that members was a valid table in the database. But is it the table used in this query? For that we need yet another test using table.field notation: it only works for tables that are actually part of this query, not merely that the table exists.

SELECT email, passwd, login_id, full_name
  FROM members
 WHERE email = 'x' AND members.email IS NULL; --';

When this returned “Email unknown”, it confirmed that our SQL was well formed and that we had properly guessed the table name. This will be important later, but we instead took a different approach in the interim.

Finding some users

At this point we have a partial idea of the structure of the members table, but we only know of one username: the random member who got our initial “Here is your password” email. Recall that we never received the message itself, only the address it was sent to. We’d like to get some more names to work with, preferably those likely to have access to more data.

The first place to start, of course, is the company’s website to find who is who: the “About us” or “Contact” pages often list who’s running the place. Many of these contain email addresses, but even those that don’t list them can give us some clues which allow us to find them with our tool.

The idea is to submit a query that uses the LIKE clause, allowing us to do partial matches of names or email addresses in the database, each time triggering the “We sent your password” message and email. Warning: though this reveals an email address each time we run it, it also actually sends that email, which may raise suspicions. This suggests that we take it easy.

We can do the query on email name or full name (or presumably other information), each time putting in the % wildcards that LIKE supports:

SELECT email, passwd, login_id, full_name
  FROM members
 WHERE email = 'x' OR full_name LIKE '%Bob%';

Keep in mind that even though there may be more than one “Bob”, we only get to see one of them: this suggests refining our LIKE clause narrowly.

Ultimately, we may only need one valid email address to leverage our way in.

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